Security and Anti-Theft Bags

I heard recently that it’s NOT a question of IF your identity will be stolen….it’s a question of WHEN….  I find that fact a little unsettling.  😦

However, my hope is to do all I can to make that ‘when’ NOT when I’m on vacation (i.e.  ‘out of touch’ and difficult to be notified or to take care of it)

I learned of these anti-theft/security bags while planning an upcoming trip out of the country complete with red-eye flights and overnights in busy airports.  I wanted more security than our current bags/backpacks offered.

So….here’s what I’ve learned…and what I purchased.

In shopping, I concentrated on the Travelon and PacSafe brands.  Reviews of both of these companies give them HIGH MARKS – similar in their anti-theft properties.

Anti-theft Technology 

in both of these brands…  🙂

  • Cut Resistant Technology
    • Shoulder straps have cable inside to stop strap slashers.
    • Side and bottom panels have wire mesh inside to stop bag slashers

Travelon LTD Tote   (on my wish list)  🙂

  • Lockdown Hardware
    • Straps can be attached to poles, posts, chairs, etc….
    • Locking zippers prevent pickpockets
  • RFID Blocking Technology:  pockets for credit cards and passports with RFID blocking materials to block ID Thieves.  Thieves can easily purchase chip readers that enable them to simply walk past you… and scan personal information from credit cards/passports INSIDE your purse/wallet…without ever making contact with you or your bag.  Men’s wallets in back hip pockets are especially susceptible.  The RFID blocking material protects your personal information.

And….these bags are actually quite ‘travel’ stylish.  There is a line of leather products, though that was more than I wanted to spend, so I opted for the less expensive lines…but that IS available if that’s your preference.   🙂

**Read below for other options on RFID blocking materials (even a way to MAKE YOUR OWN) if these bags, wallets, etc… are not in your budget.  These aren’t necessarily the ‘best’ option….but they will work – if that’s what you need to do. 

 

These two brands  (Travelon and PacSafe )  are comparable in price and security features. Beyond that, our decisions came down to design and usability…I preferred the Travelon bags for myself.  My husband, who prefers to travel with a backpack, chose the PacSafe. Now….neither of these brands are ‘cheap’….However, some small discounts are out there if you are willing to jump through the necessary hoops.

I began my research on the company websites (my recommendation…).   That’s where I found accurate information on dimensions, etc…. (As you may know, info on Amazon may or may not be correct) and which bags had the features we each wanted.  Once I knew what bags I was interested in, I compared prices on other sites – Amazon, eBags….and strangely enough, Kohl’s which carries a SMALL inventory of these bags. (Target sells a FEW of their wallets).  Prices really don’t vary much among these sources, but with Kohls coupons/Kohl’s Dollars or discounts with Amazon, there may be some savings.  TJ Maxx and Marshalls occasionally has a small inventory of Travelon items though I’ve rarely found the bags…and of course, their inventory is constantly changing….

For myself, I was looking at TWO bags – a cross body purse for traveling days or days touring crowded public places  AND a carry on for the flights.  My husband was in the market for a backpack.

Purse:  I wanted something cross body, small and lightweight but still large enough to carry wallet, passport, cell phone/cord, and a few personal items.  I found what I wanted in the Travelon Anti-theft Classic Essential Messenger Bag on Amazon.  With discounts/reward points I ended up paying around $25 for it.

 

 

Carry On:  My carry on was a tough decision –

East West Weekender

because I had so many ‘requirements’.  It had to accommodate my laptop and a binder notebook.  I wanted a secured front pocket (locking zipper) for smaller items and an easy access slip pocket for boarding passes, luggage tickets, etc…   I also needed a sleeve on the back to slip over luggage handles once we picked up our checked bags. Finding all of those features – in a bag that was just the right size….took some time…. but I finally found it.  I got the Travelon  Anti-Theft East/West Weekender Tote.  I purchased it from eBags using reward point earned from buying my husband’s back pack the month before. I think this particular bag has been discontinued as they constantly update their inventory, however, with every bag they discontinue, they introduce another ‘better’ one to take it’s place.  ha!!

 

NOTE:  When buying multiple things from eBags, buy the most expensive item first. When the reward points for that purchase post, (30 days later) buy the next most expensive item on your wish list applying that credit…and so on and so on…down your list. Their reward point system is VERY NICE!!!  🙂

BackPack: My husband chose a backpack from PacSafe. In addition to all the security features, he wanted good back structure/support. It also had to accommodate his DSLR camera and all it’s ‘toys’….  He found what he wanted in the Venturesafe X30 Anti-Theft Adventure Backpack.  This now has a rain cover which wasn’t available when we purchased…and would have really come in handy in Alaska.  :/

 

These bags held up very well on our trip. They were really nice to have on our red-eye flights and long layovers where we definitely snoozed a bit.  Being able to lock pockets and secure our bags to chairs or posts gave us a little more security…and more ability to relax a bit.

I expect these bags to be around for years to come.

TESTING RFID

There are multiple YouTube videos  on testing RFID blocking properties.  Here’s what I found on a quick search:  RFID Blocking Testing   When watching these, confirm you’re watching from independent sources and not from a company that’s just promoting their own brand while discrediting their competitors.  Travelon and PacSafe (and a few others) produced successful test results.

 

Now….What if These Products are OUT of Your Budget:

Well, you may not be able to get the ‘slash-proof’ features, but you CAN address the RFID issue less expensively.

  1. RFID blocking wallets –  Travelon, PacSafe or ID Stronghold brands tested well.
  2. RFID Blocking Sleeves:  These can be purchased from Amazon. (and possibly Marshalls or TJMaxx if you happen to catch it just right)  They are sleeves to slide credit cards and/or passports into.  Buyer Beware:  Not all sleeves are the same. Read reviews carefully…with special attention to reviewers who have actually ‘tested them’.  There are sleeves that ‘work’…then there are sleeves that are ‘pretty’….and some reviewers leave you scratching your head when they write reviews saying: “I LOVE my RFID sleeves.  They’re so pretty…all my friends commented that they wanted some too.”    Go figure!!!  *sigh*

 

DIY Test for RFID Blocking:

How can you be SURE these really work?  Insert a work badge…door badge…or any card that is scanned into the sleeve/wallet/pocket and try to use it.  If you can’t use it, then you know it’s adequately blocking.   OR….you can just trust the reviews on Amazon….just look for MULITPLE people saying the same thing.  Of course, Travelon, PacSafe or ID Stronghold are reputable companies that bring with their name a sense of ‘trust’….  🙂

I purchased a pack of sleeves (12 credit card; 4 passport) from Amazon.  They’re nothing fancy…nothing pretty, but they do the job.  I was pleased with them and we are still using them.

Make Your Own

You CAN make your own RFID blocking sleeves using aluminum foil.  These homemade varieties passed the testing when made with THREE sheets of Heavy Duty aluminum foil. Check out YouTube videos for instructions on how to do this (and watch several videos/techniques to gather the best ideas from everyone).

As you might imagine, these homemade sleeves are only a TEMPORARY fix…as they  will require care when inserting or removing the credit card to keep them from tearing…but if an RFID blocking wallet or bag is not in your budget, this CAN work…

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Alaska Cruise: Skagway, AK

We were up early this morning too…to catch yet another sunrise.  Those are addictive!!

As was the case every morning, the fog rolled in about 7 a.m….then turned into rain.

Skagway:  Skagway is the jumping off point for the Klondike Highway.  The town itself is part of the Klondike Nat’l Historical Park – complete with everything you find in a Nat’l Park.  For those who choose to stay in town, there are many activities associated with the Nat’l Park System to keep someone busy -(Visitor Center, narrated or DIY tours, museums, buildings, etc…)  There’s also tourist shopping on the 4-5 streets in this very walkable town.

Our plan for today would include driving (I’ll explain why we chose rental car over train in a bit…) the Klondike Hwy… stopping frequently –  going as far as Emerald Lake, then returning to Skagway to explore the Nat’l Park.  As is our custom, we would cram as much as we possibly could into our 13 hrs in port…  We got off the ship a little later than planned with the rain – it was 7:45.  We braved the rain and went to see the Klondike!!!     

Donned in our down coats, hats, AND a raincoat over everything we walked the 6 blocks (actually, we ran…) to Avis where our rental car was.

Here we go…with odometer set to ‘zero’ to match mile markers on the Murray’s Guide, we headed out of town.

Murray’s Guide is a mile-marker guide of the Klondike Highway.   It can be purchased online (download) for $5 and includes a discount at Yukon Suspension Bridge and Tutshi Sled Dog Tours.  If those are part of your plan, it’s DEFINTELY worth $5 for the Guide.  HOWEVER, the author has also put on the website a FREE version.  It’s more compact, but fit our needs BETTER as we didn’t think we would have time to tour those discounted locations anyway.  As with the Treadwell Mine guide yesterday, I copy/pasted this to a document and edited it down to manageable size – from 8 pages down to 4.  Avis also sent me an abbreviated mile-by-mile guide several weeks before our trip and I added parts of that to my ‘edited’ version as well… I ended up with a pretty comprehensive guide….   That, along with a simple 1 page map from a brochure I received in the mail was all we needed for our day. (The Klondike Highway is a single highway with just a few spur roads…not much chance of getting lost….but  don’t expect to rely on GPS…   There’s very little if any data connection a few miles out of Skagway)

Driving the Klondike Highway:

The first stop I had ‘planned’ was Gold Rush Cemetery and the trail head to Lower Reid Falls.  It was still raining pretty heavily as we drove by that pull off so we decided to catch that on our way BACK…  (we didn’t…but that’s another story….) 

From there, we just kept an eye on the odometer and constantly referred to my printed guide.  There were many pullouts –  everything from waterfalls to rivers to lakes to the William Moore asymmetrical bridge…and multiple historic sites about the Klondike gold rush and trails or Venus Mine.  The views were spectacular and the Murray’s Guide gave us information about what we were seeing.

We crossed into Canada around M15….which means the “Welcome to Alaska” sign was on the opposite side of the road.  We got our photo THEN….thankfully…as on our return trip that afternoon, there were buses, shuttles and cars lined up with many people waiting for their chance at a photo with the sign. 

We didn’t actually go through Canadian Customs until M22.  This was a pretty painless stop…they asked us why we were there, and when we told them we were cruise ship passengers, they waved us through…  I guess there’s not much chance of cruise passengers over-staying their welcome.  NOTE:  YOU MUST HAVE PASSPORTS FOR THIS DAY’S DRIVE….TO GET INTO CANADA!!!!  (Make notes of that….in RED!  haha!)  

This is the Thompson River  (approx M20) and the WP&YR Railroad.  We were fortunate to be here just when the train crossed…I had hoped for that, but didn’t know exactly HOW to make it happen.  How lucky were we??    🙂  

Many recommend the WP&YR  as a “Must Do” activity in Skagway. It sounds wonderful in all the descriptions…and everyone who does it raves about it.  However, that was not what we chose to do.  In our ‘shopping’ all our options, we realized that our desire was to stop, see, gaze,  all on our own ‘schedule’.  The only way to do that is with a rental car.  

All the ‘train excursions’ (there are several options…train round trip…train/bus combination, shuttles or vans, etc…) don’t stop at all…no time for ‘gazing’ or ‘enjoying’.    That…plus the fact that our rental car for the day driving all the way to Emerald Lake was the cost of ONE train ticket to ONLY go to Carcross, was enough for us to know that car rental was the best choice for us.

The road follows the Tutshi River then Tutshi Lake for 10 miles.  The fireweed (that we learned about a couple of days ago from the Naturalist on board) is showing the ending of summer…

Tutshi Lake

 

The “Welcome to the Yukon” sign is at M50.  We took THAT picture on the route TO Carcross as well.  – All the pullouts were much busier in the afternoon so I advise to take any photos you want in the morning!!  

 

Bove Island and Tagish Lake….one of the highlights of the drive… 

Bove Island & Tagish Lake M59

 

When we arrived at Carcross, we decided to go on past it…to our furthest point, Emerald Lake…and work our way back.

Carcross Desert IMG_6790 Carcross DesertCarcross Desert is labeled as the World’s Smallest Desert…  It did indeed look pretty small…so I guess they’re right?  🙂 🙂 🙂 

 

Emerald Lake  

Emerald Lake M 73

 

Carcross:

Carcross is 66 miles from Skagway.  Our trip all the way to Emerald Lake was 75 miles (one way).  Going any further than that risks the potential for fog….dense enough to limit visibility to 5 ft.  – making for a long and dangerous trip BACK to Skagway.  We didn’t want to risk that….  Also, the ‘word on the street’ is that there’s really nothing past Emerald Lake spectacular enough to warrant the extra time, drive and ‘risk’.

Carcross is a small town – built up to accommodate the tourists coming in on the train.  There is a school, Post Office,  General Store, etc…and even a Hotel and city pool.    The place we HAD to find was the Sourdough Bakery. She was selling her cinnamon rolls for half price by the time we arrived…Thankfully, she accepted USD as that was all we had….and I HAD to have one of those!!!    

While in Carcross, we saw a train come steaming into town.  🙂 🙂  That almost made me wish we’d taken the train….but I had to remember what a relaxing and wonderful morning we’d just had…and the fact we’d seen Carcross Desert and Emerald Lake by driving- to remind myself of WHY we made the decision we did.

We stepped into a few shops and had a bite of lunch…followed of course, by that delectable  cinnamon roll.  🙂 Then it was time to RELUCTANTLY head back to Skagway.  We DID want to have time to see the Nat’l Park museum and  Vis. Center et al. -which would close at 5:30.  🙂

We got some pretty good photos on our drive back…some areas that were in rain or fog on our drive north.  In fact….several of the photos I’ve posted above were actually taken on this drive back to Skagway.

We got back to town about 4 pm and headed straight to the Visitor Center.

Klondike Gold Rush Nat’l Historic Park:

The entire town of Skagway is part of the Nat’l Park system.  In addition to the Visitor Center/museum, etc…there are several houses and historical buildings open for tours….until 5:30.  Unfortunately, the clock and time were not our friend…we just didn’t have time to go in them.  We started at the Visitor Center…and it’s museum next door.   It was very small…but gave a pretty good overview of the gold rush, miners and the Chilkoot Trail.  After watching the film, it was nearing 5:30…the Nat’l Park service buildings were closing so we just walked around town a little bit.  We darted into the Red Onion Saloon for a quick look, then decided to drive over to Dyea and walk a bit of the Chilkoot Trail before re-boarding the ship.

The Chilkoot Trail is the trail minors used to get to the gold fields – it’s 33 miles long, but we like to walk trails like this…for just a little way to say we’ve ‘done it’.   🙂  Dyea was about 6-7 miles east of Skagway but not long after we turned onto Dyea Road, it turned to gravel.  Gravel roads were forbidden by Avis Car Rental.  We debated what to do, (could we get by with breaking the rules??? hmm….)  but finally decided we’d better just turn around.  On the way back we stopped at a scenic pullout for views of Skagway and the harbor….and of course, our ship.    IMG_6853  Skagway

To Note: The Star Princess was at Railroad Dock Forward….the dock against the mountainside – the first (front) dock.

We returned the rental car, and got back on the ship.  The ship wasn’t scheduled to leave Skagway until 8:30 that evening, but after 3 port days in a row…and a very full day today, we were exhausted!!!  With this change in plans, we found we were actually able to go to the Main Dining room tonight.  It was nice to have an ‘unplanned’ night there after missing a ‘planned’ night for whale watching outside of Ketchikan.   🙂

What a GOOD decision this was!!!  Crab legs and Crème Brule were on the menu!!

After dinner, all we wanted to do was relax…unpack our daybags…and turn our sites to tomorrow – GLACIER BAY!!   We were due to pick up the Nat’l Park Rangers at 6:15…but the Naturalist had told us to be out by 5:30am…It would be ANOTHER very early day as we saw “All Things Alaska”.

Nope….no time (or energy)  for entertainment…or art sales…or MUTS (Movies Under the Stars).  The Finale for the Voice of the Ocean was tonight….we missed that one too.  We were busy every minute with “Alaska”…and if we weren’t ‘busy’, we were exhausted from all the ‘busy-ness’.  It was time for bed!   🙂


Budget:

Cruise Line or Private Company Tours:  The cruise lines and tour companies offer as many options for going up the Klondike Hwy as there are people to buy them. There are tours that take the train round trip, bus one way and train the other.  Shuttles…vans…either with or without a train trip one way.  They have tours that include gold panning…or lunch….stops at dog sledding, Fraser or Bennett….and on and on.  The options are somewhat overwhelming.

Prices for these in 2017  ranged from $45pp for the basics of a trip to M14 (doesn’t even enter the Yukon/Canada)  to $229 pp for round trip train to Carcross with the extras.  However…NONE of them go all the way to Emerald Lake that I could tell.

OUR Plan:  We rented a car for $125 + fuel for the day…   We were able to go not only PAST Carcross to Emerald Lake and Carcross Desert, but stop as we wished throughout the day…and before returning the car, drive up to that scenic overlook for views of Skagway and the harbor.

Yeah…I’m a huge cheerleader for the “rent a car” option.  🙂

 

Tomorrow:  Alaska Cruise: Cruising Glacier Bay

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Alaska Cruise: Juneau AK

Terrace Pool Deck 12Aft  017

This is actually the Terrace Pool on Caribbean Princess, but basically the same on all Grand Class ships.

 

We were up early and out at the Terrace Pool (aft) to see the sunrise again this morning.  At 6 am it was beautiful…by 7:30 the fog had rolled in and you couldn’t see 5 ft off the side of the ship.  Have I said it before??  At this time of year, the fog MAY roll in around 7-7:30am…to see the ‘beautiful stuff’, you have to rise before the fog.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Juneau:  Juneau is the capital of Alaska…but one of the things that makes it so unique is that it is ONLY accessible via air…or water.  There is a highway going through Juneau…it’s 37 miles long…with a ‘beginning’ and an ‘end’.   There’s an airport…with LOTS of floatplanes…and of course, the Alaska Ferry provides transportation for many…but you can’t drive TO Juneau.

We docked at Franklin St. Dock. (where Princess docks most frequently)  It’s not the ‘closest’ one to town but is still  within walking distance (if not mobility challenged).  We disembarked at 8 and walked to Mt Roberts Tramway…about 6-7 blocks??  We had purchased our Tramway tickets through Princess with our On Board Credit (part of the 3-For-Free from Princess when we booked).

Mt Robert’s Tramway:  The “official word” from many tourists about the tramway is to not go up if it’s cloudy or foggy…however, because the ticket would allow us unlimited trips all day long, we decided to go ahead and purchase it.  Once at the top we were ABOVE the fog…and had a rather nice view.

OUR views on this ‘foggy’ day… Not Bad!!

By arriving there early, we avoided many of the crowds that LINED UP later in the day – and we didn’t have to vie for window space for photos (the windows ‘swing’ open btw…)  There is an extensive trail system at the top and we walked a small bit of it…far enough to got some great views of Juneau and our ship in the harbor below but then came down off the mountain… There was no time to waste!

photo taken from the trail – Mt Roberts Tramway

 

This is Juneau (on the left),  the Douglas Island Bridge crossing the Gastineau Channel…and Douglas on the right…  (location of Treadwell Mine where we’ll head later today)

 

 

 

When we got off the mountain, we transported to AJ Dock and Juneau Rental Cars.  Juneau Rental Cars rents older model, higher mileage cars…for FAR less than the name brand companies in town.  An additional benefit to renting from them was ‘location’.  This summer, (2017)  the hotel that housed the downtown offices for Avis was closed for remodel.  All Avis reservations defaulted to the airport which would mean wither a city bus ride (time consuming BOTH ways) or taxi (quite expensive…) to pick up and drop off cars.  That’s when I found Juneau Rental Cars. They are located next to AJ Dock (about a mile from our dock) but once I found out that if there’s a ship at AJ Dock, there will be a shuttle from the Vis. Ctr, our decision was made. From AJ Dock, it’s a 1 block walk to the Rental office. We had no trouble with our ‘older model, higher mileage’ car.  It got us where we needed to go…at a very good rate… and in much less time than renting from the airport.

First Stop:  Mendenhall Glacier – about 12 miles out of town. The Visitor Center had large viewing windows…exhibits and a film.  There are several hikes, but the two we took were Photo Point Trail and Nugget Falls Trail.

img_6659.jpg

 

Photo Point Trail (.3 mi one way) gave us a straight on view of both Falls and Glacier.

 

 

 

Nugget Falls Trail  (1 mi  one way) is a spur off of the Photo Point Trail- and provided an  ‘up close and personal ‘ view of the falls with the glacier behind.  It’s possible to get all the way UP to the water (if you choose???)  We didn’t get quite that close….  🙂

 

On the drive back to town on Egan Hwy, we stopped for lunch.  We passed several local diners, but were a little apprehensive about stopping someplace without knowing anything about it…so we just opted for  McDonalds.  It was quick…and came with wi-fi. 🙂

Then, it was on to DIPAC McCauley Salmon Hatchery.  (DIPAC)  A tour had just begun as we arrived and we were instructed to join them in progress.  I wish we had waited for the next tour as we missed some good information joining that way…

The guide took us through the life cycle of the salmon from hatching to release, showing the tanks and describing how the salmon are cared for at each stage.  There are self-explanatory exhibits along the way as well…and viewing from above the tanks and ladder – or viewing windows to see below the waterline.  Quite a bit of what we learned today ‘explained’ what we saw yesterday in Ketchikan.

Inside the building, there were 2 rooms of exhibits – and a touch tank.  Though the touch tank was more geared to kids, the guide invited everyone to ‘touch’.  🙂  The ‘spikes’ on these creatures are actually all for ‘show’….they’re actually very soft in spite of their “ominous” appearance.

 

Next Stop:  Crossing Douglas Island Bridge (10th Street)  to Douglas Island..and the Treadwell Mine.

Treadwell Mine is (was) the largest gold mine of all time – producing $70 million in gold 1883-1917.  Then in 1917 after a particularly high tide, within 3 1/2 hrs, the sides caved in and approx. 3 million tons of seawater filled the mines…all but destroying the operation there.  (a few mines further away stayed open until 1922 but it was never the operation it had once been)   There is now a Historical trail – with numbered markers denoting point of interest,  foundations, stamp mills, vaults, and even a few shells of buildings through the area.  Full descriptions of the markers can be found at:  http://www.juneau.org/parkrec/facilities/documents/TreadBroch1.pdf   I doubted seriously if I’d have data connection to access any info on my phone, so I copied/pasted this info and edited it down to a manageable size (it was 11 pages when I started…3 pgs when I finished)…and brought that.  I was SO glad I had done that as as that was the only info we had (and data on our phones was spotty at best).  NOTE: The one thing I failed to keep in my edited version was the map of the area.  I assumed the path and markers would be self-explanatory. The paths intertwined and we found ourselves often searching for the next marker.  If I were to do this again, I would DEFINITELY print the map!

We were basically alone on this peaceful trail….other than locals walking their dogs.  This isn’t a top tourist attraction like Mendenhall….which is part of the reason we enjoyed it so.  🙂

Our original plan for the evening was to go BACK up Mt Robert’s Tramway (the ticket offered unlimited rides) to photograph in the evening light.  However, instead, we opted to get back on the ship to see/hear Libby Riddles (first female Iditarod Champion…).  We returned the rental, transported back to the main square…walked the 6 blocks to the ship – darting into a few stores, then got back on board.

Libby Riddles Presentation was at 7 pm that evening.   I was a little surprised to see how many passengers were there considering that “All Aboard” wasn’t until 8:45.   🙂

She is quite an interesting lady…left home at age 16 to come to Alaska…got her GED, lived among the natives for 6 yrs, and learned how to breed and train her own dogs.  She went on to win the Iditarod (first female to do so)  in 1985.  She is a primary presenter for Princess cruises – boards all of their ships in Juneau to meet and talk with passengers about mushing, the dogs, the Iditarod…and to autograph her books.  I’m so glad we modified our plan to see her!!!

The remainder of our evening was getting a bite to eat, repacking our day bags for tomorrow, watching a beautiful sunset during Sail Away and reading Alaska’s Cruise Companion about all the sites and wonders awaiting us tomorrow in Skagway…

Budget:  To Do What We Did Today Via Princess Excursions:

  • Mendenhall Glacier  – $45 pp.
  • Mendenhall WITH the Hatchery and Glacier Gardens (a botanical garden) was $85pp.
  • Mt Roberts Tramway tickets were the same price either from the cruise line or at the Tramway gate….   We purchased ours from PCL and used our OBC (On Board Credit) so for us, they were ‘basically free’ …

There are no Cruiseline excursions to Treadwell Mine.

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To Do What We Did Today with Booked or Public Transportation:

  • Taxi to Mendenhall:  $35 each way
  • Private Excursion companies offer shuttles to Mendenhall.  These companies seem to ‘come and go’….but prices stay pretty consistent – approx. $30pp this year.
  • Public Transit $2pp each trip:  In 2017, Capital Transit (Blue/White Bus)  dropped visitors off 1.5 mi from the Mendenhall Vis. Ctr.  Visitors walk that distance there and back.  (Perhaps that will change in the future – but that’s the ‘story’ from 2017)  Public Transit goes to Douglas Island and ‘close’ to Treadwell Mine – drops off  (and picks up)  .5 mi from the Mine/Trail area.

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Our Costs:  Rental car FOR THE DAY – $60 + fuel.  We could go anywhere or to as many places as we chose….AND have a place to stash day bag, coats/jackets, etc… while sightseeing without having to carry them all day long.  Transportation to pick up and drop off from Juneau Rental Cars was free.  (not so if renting from an airport location)

 

Tomorrow:  Alaska Cruise – Skagway AK

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